Kampen om folkeskolen

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Kampen om folkeskolen

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Title: Kampen om folkeskolen
Udviklingen af policydannelsesprocesserne på folkeskoleområdet fra 1993 til 2010
Author: Jensen, Lena; Lohse, Gitte
Abstract: This Master Thesis, prepared as a part of the Master of Public Administration study at Copenhagen Business School, in the autumn of 2011, focuses on the development of the policymaking processes in the policy area of primary and lower secondary school over the last two decades in Denmark. Over the last decades there has been - what we have chosen to call - a struggle for the primary and lower secondary school. A political struggle about changes in the school mission and contents, changes in political cooperation, changes in the corporate collaboration and changes in the public mood. Thus a struggle for the development of policymaking processes - both in relation to the institutional framework and in relation to stakeholders. Therefore we pose one main question: “Which premises does the institutional struggle for the primary and lower secondary school set for the future policymaking processes?” The primary and lower secondary school in Denmark has through the last two decades been met by an increasing political demand to “deliver” pupils with strong professional skills. The objectives are that the primary and lower secondary school must be better ranked in the OECD PISA scores and that 95 % of a youth year must complete a tertiary education. There has been a long tradition in Denmark for political consensus in the policy area of primary and lower secondary school and a tradition for a strong corporate involvement and collaboration between the different stakeholders. This degree of collaboration has been challenged by the previous government which can be illustrated by New Year’s speech 2002 of the Prime Minister Anders Fogh Rasmussen who pronounced a removal of - what he called - “superfluous” governmental councils, boards and institutions. The Danish School system was earlier considered as “World Class” in a general public opinion. But with the PISA results the picture has changed. Thus there have been many attempts to improve the results of the primary and lower secondary school. The primary and lower secondary school has been subject for an increasing number of reforms where various stakeholders wish to seek influence in the political decision processes. The main question is explored through two subordinate questions: • How has the policymaking process in the policy area of primary and lower secondary school been organized in 1993, 2006 and 2010? • How can we understand the change and development in the policymaking processes from 1993 to 2010? The first subordinate question is made operational by a policy analysis of the policymaking process in 1993, 2006 and 2010 – years where significant changes of the primary and lower secondary school have occurred. The second subordinate question is made operational by a historical institutional analysis based on the conclusions from the policy analysis. This is followed by an interpretation of the development in the policymaking processes. Finally the conclusions are discussed and put into perspective. The conclusion is, that we have been able to identify five main trends in the policymaking processes from 1993 to 2010. The trends are: • A change in focus from an educational policy towards a policy for economic growth • A change in legitimating policy of primary and lower secondary school from knowledge from professionals towards knowledge from OECD economic research • A change from corporative policymaking processes towards political strategic leadership • A change from corporative collaboration through institutionalized channels towards network based ad hoc discussions • A change from an extended and closed institutionalized process towards short open and loosely coupled processes We find that these changes set new premises for the future policymaking processes and in our perspective we suggest how stakeholders – for example The Danish Teachers Union - could act upon the new premises to maintain and gain influence in the policymaking processes. We discuss how redesign in a future policymaking process could be set up to make results that could be implemented with effect in primary and lower secondary school.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10417/2895
Date: 2012-02-06
Pages: 128 s.
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